twitter_logoSick of seeing your friends’ happy, optimistic tweets when they’re away from home? Or can’t stand that co-worker who gleefully gloats about their vacation on Twitter?

You can’t blame them, a new study suggests.

According to researchers at the University of Vermont, people’s tweets are happier the further away they are from home.

The group analyzed roughly four billion tweets, sent from the year 2011 to now.

They compared tweets sent from a user’s geographical home location to messages sent out of town.

Using the exact latitude and longitude of tweets (to within 10 metres), researchers classified tweets based on whether they were sent near where a user lived, or from somewhere different.

You might be wondering – how did they know where a user lived? Well, it was simply a matter of knowing where most tweets were sent from, over and over, on a consistent basis.

Figuring out a tweet’s happiness was a little more complicated. To solve that problem, they came up with hedonometer.

Taking into account the number of words in a tweet, such as “great”, “new” – helped classify a tweet as being happy.

Meanwhile, a tweet with “hate” or “bored” would symbolize a negative tweet.

What they found was that the happiness of tweets goes up the further away they are from home, especially when they’re thousands of kilometres away from home.

Tweets about 1 km from home are typically less happy.

Users on Twitter who usually have a wider variation in distances also tended to use the happier words more often those who didn’t always tweet from such a selection of different places, away from home.

That doesn’t necessarily mean that jet-setters are happier, but it just means that they’re tweeting happier thoughts.

Do you get sick of seeing really happy or sad tweets on Twitter?